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Posts from March 2019

Did you know that Queen Victoria was an influencer of her day? On her wedding day she wore a white gown, something that was not popular at the time. She teamed it with a white veil and orange blossom wreath 
Of course there was no social media and it wasn't televised but word still got around through fashion magazines and newspapers. Soon the previously fashionable silver for bridal gowns was no more and a new tradition, the white wedding dress was born 
 
Although white fabric remained a staple, the elements of bridal attire remained subject to fashionable change. Queen Victoria patronised Honiton lace and many wealthy brides followed this trend and deep flounces of Honiton lace were not uncommon, often paired with Honiton lace veils and a floral wreath 
 
Flowergirl outfits of the day tended to be ornate. Flowergirls were often seen in a dress and jacket, trimmed with swansdown, to which were added scarves, sashes and bonnets - a veritable smorgasbord of frills and furbelows. Or, put another way, more in the 19th century, was definitely more 
 
Nic 
XX  
 
 
 
Come and visit me at the Hatfield House wedding show on 24th March 2019. Find out more about this ancient stately home below... 
The handsome jacobean Hatfield House and garden was built in 1611 by Robert Cecil, the 1st Earl of Salisbury. Impressively its been in the ownership of the Cecil family ever since and is currently the home of the 7th Marquess 
 
 
It will be fascinating to see what London Bridal Fashion Week and White Gallery will be showcasing this spring. Read on to find out what's predicted for 2019  
I'm pleased to say that embellishment, including floral appliques, are hot, hot, hot. If you came to the recent wedding show at Chelsea Old Town Hall you will recognise the bridal gown I was showing (shown with 'Elowen' flower girl dress). This stylish one-shoulder dress featured a gorgeous floral applique by Platinum Bridal Fabrics 
 
Continuing to be on trend are luxurious laces, illusion details and opulent beading. Brides are spoiled for choice. Conversely we are going to see more pared back, unadorned styles, ultra slinky and feminine. Megan Markle started that trend and what could be better than aligning one's self with royalty... 
Choosing a wedding dress can be a confusing task. Everyone will have an opinion on what will suit you..... 
Watch the second part of my series of videos on what skirt shapes suit which figure to find out whether an empire line style of dress will suit you. Grow in confidence that the dress you choose will truly be the dress of your dreams 
 
Nic 
XX 
On a recent visit to ZSL London Zoo I discovered something fascinating about this little fella. Warning though, proceed passed here at your own peril arachnophobes! 
This little chap is the Golden Silk Orb Weaver or Nephila Edulis. It's habitat is tropical forest, usually in Australia and New Guinea. It's prey is mainly flying insects and it rarely bites. It's said to be useless off its web  
So why is it so useful to humans? Well, the silk that it makes its web with is an incredibly useful resource. Get this: 
 
A single strand is long enough to circle the earth (40,000 km) yet weighs less than a bar of soap  
 
A rope of spider silk as thick as a pencil could stop a Boeing 747 mid-flight 
 
It is tougher than Kevlar, which is used to make bullet proof vests  
 
And it's been providing silk for years! Napolean is said to have had stockings made out of spider silk and hunters from tribes in New Guinea used orb spider webs as fishing nets. They would make frames from sticks and wait for the spiders to spin a net for them! Ingenious 
 
So, it's tempting to get rid of that horrible looking spider that runs out from under my sofa, but before I do, I shall spare a thought for what that spider might be quietly and unassumingly doing for me and perhaps pop him or her safely in the garden 
 
Thanks to ZSL London Zoo for the facts! 
 
 
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